The Other Side Of Job Creation

It astonishes me to see how everyone buys the ‘job creation’ story the state and media sells them, without considering the bigger picture. What I believe most people fail to ask is how many jobs were not created elsewhere, where there is a greater need or bigger demand. In order for new businesses to flourish, it will require reallocation of capital and people and their skills to higher yielding industries and businesses. This process is very important to the agility and livelihood of a healthy economy, where unproductive businesses close down to make way for new ones that can use the resources (capital and people) better, because they can better provide things people really want at prices they’re willing to pay. When government (and the labor unions) intervenes in this process, they waste capital by not directing resources to the most desirable industries and businesses, and applying it to their political agenda.

Consider this about private businesses: If they fail to produce in the cheapest and best possible way those things which people most need, they suffer losses and are eliminated from the economy. Other businesses who know better how to deliver the right things, at the right price, replace them. This is how inefficient businesses get eliminated from the economy, a kind of survival of the fittest. If you take the wrong decisions in business, you get punished very quickly. Do it long enough and you’re out.

Now consider this – government’s ‘capital’ comes from tax or debt. Debt is just borrowing against a government’s future income, that in turn comes from tax. Therefore, ultimately, all government’s income comes from tax. But in government’s case there is absolutely no incentive or threat to use it efficiently. Because government doesn’t get eliminated from the economy when it makes the wrong decisions about how and what to use resources for, it continues to do so at a much greater cost to the economy.

With every new ‘job creation’ project government funds, that same amount of money was previously taken away from productive businesses. Because of government’s inefficiency and misallocation, it is very likely that a lot more could have been done with the resources elsewhere, including hiring people. Also, based on what criteria does government direct resources? Yes, a lot of it is probably for the “greater good” and altruistic in nature, but an enormous part of the criteria is determined by political, emotional, subjective and selfish factors.

Another thing I find quite amusing to read is how the competition commission hunted down and punished the latest business cartel that is hurting the man on the street by manipulating prices. What is a cartel other than a type of monopoly? And we all know how much our beloved socialist government loves their state controlled monopolies: Eskom, Transnet, Telkom, PetroSA and Infraco. And what they don’t already control under these state enterprises and government departments, I’m sure they are planning to take over soon. By the sounds of it, mining and banking is next on the cards. So on the one hand government continuously seeks to end anti-competitive behavior, but on the other it’s recommended as the best solution to the nation’s problems. If there’s one thing the South African economy needs is more competition, but not only in the form of a reactive central watchdog that runs around trying to police the 3 or 5 big players in each industry. Instead we need to focus on growing the size, quality and number of entrepreneurial businesses in each industry.

At this stage government and the labour unions, are blocking the free readjustment and reallocation of resources to new businesses that can use it to better produce that what is required more. Government sucks more resources out of the economy, in the form of tax for their ‘job creation’, and labor unions force artificial labor costs on businesses. Instead of addressing the true underlying problems of our economy, government chooses to prop up ailing industries and expand the public sector. In the long run this will do very little to solve the dysfunctional structure of our economy:

1. There is poor separation of concerns between the labor unions, Cosatu, and the government. Cosatu helps the ANC government stay in power. Let’s not forget they were the big reason Zuma was elected as president, and election after election tell their members to vote for the ANC. This makes government unlikely to make the necessary labor and economic reforms, needed to pursue a true growth strategy.

2. Labour unions and the ANC government must accept, that it’s impossible to keep all current jobs, with increasing salaries, and have meaningful success in creating new businesses. Rather focus on creating new businesses, making current ones more competitive and allowing labour to adjust to the industry’s natural cost and employment structure. This means there will be jobs lost, before new ones can be created.

3. The ANC government must also realize that the free market economy is better at determining how to use resources. Resources are still wasted in a free market economy, but not for long. Expanding the public sector payroll, increasing grants, and so forth, requires more tax money, which in the end defeats their original purpose of improving living conditions.

Government Covers Up Underlying Problems by Increasing Public Sector Employment

By April 2010 the private sector (excluding agriculture) lost some 377,000 jobs from a peak in October 2008. Since then the private sector has only been able to add a 94,470 jobs, and the public sector added 106,503 or 53% of 201,000. In July 2011, private sector employment has grown 0.5% since a year before, and the public sector 3.3%. I’m just wondering what all these new government employees are doing? What are they creating that other people need? What new industries, technologies,and specialized skills are they mastering?

National departments’ wages also increased by 11.3% for the year to July 2011, and increased by more than 10% for the past 2 years. Private sector wages only increased by 7,4%. So clearly the place to work in South Africa is at government departments. This has to mean that these people are making the most important contributions to our economy, or does it? The figures seem to suggest they own specialized skills that are in high demand, because not only is the country hiring more of these people, but we’re also paying them more.

To get a picture of the SA government’s debt, I quote a sentence from the SA Reserve Bank’s Quarterly Bulletin for December 2011: “As a ratio of gross domestic product, national government’s total gross loan debt increased from 35,4 per cent to 37,3 per cent during the period under review.” So quite an innocent figure really, especially considering that America’s debt to GDP is 100% and Greece’s is 150%. But as in all things finance, it’s the trends that reveal the truth. In 2007 this figure was 27.4%, and except for 2008, has grown every year since then. Makes one wonder if South Africa isn’t maybe Africa’s version of a Greece in the making?

References

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